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Cetuximab May Have Value to Target High Risk Prostate Cancer Gene SPINK1

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Aggressive PCa - Genetic Risk Factors

Wednesday, 02 March 2011 19:00

Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified a potential target to treat an aggressive type of prostate cancer. The target, a gene called SPINK1, they say "could be to prostate cancer what HER2 has become for breast cancer."

Like HER2, they say in a press release, SPINK1 occurs in only a small subset of prostate cancers – about 10 percent. "But the gene is an ideal target for a monoclonal antibody, the same type of drug as Herceptin, which is aimed at HER2 and has dramatically improved treatment for this aggressive type of breast cancer."

Read more: Cetuximab May Have Value to Target High Risk Prostate Cancer Gene SPINK1

 

Heavy Drinking Linked to Aggressive Prostate Cancer, Cancels Effect of Preventive Drug

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Behavioral Risks - Alcohol use

Friday, 14 August 2009 19:00

Heavy, daily alcohol consumption increases the risk of high-grade (aggressive) prostate cancer, according to new research from the University of California San Francisco. Heavy drinking also appears to make Proscar (finasteride) ineffective for reducing prostate cancer risk.

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New Targeted Therapy for Advanced Prostate, MDV3100, Safe and Effective in Early Trial

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Treatments - Hormonal

Thursday, 15 April 2010 13:23

An experimental drug is showing promise for the treatment of men with an aggressive form of advanced prostate cancer. A new multicenter study has concluded that the targeted therapy MDV3100 is safe and effective for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), known for its limited treatment options. The research, led by investigators at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, appears early online and in an upcoming edition of The Lancet.

Read more: New Targeted Therapy for Advanced Prostate, MDV3100, Safe and Effective in Early Trial

   

First Gene Marker Found for Aggressive Prostate Cancer

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Aggressive PCa - Genetic Risk Factors

Tuesday, 12 January 2010 12:25

A genetic variant associated with aggressive prostate cancer has been discovered by researchers at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. Claiming their discovery as a "first," the  scientists say  that one day genetic information may be used in combination with other factors to guide treatment decisions.

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Treatments - Surgery

Tuesday, 13 October 2009 19:00

Shorter and Safer Hospital Stays But More Risk of Incontinence and Erectile Dysfunction, Study Shows

New research indicates that the use of minimally invasive procedures (including the use of robotic assistance) for radical prostatectomy, which have increased significantly in recent years, may shorten hospital stays and decrease respiratory and surgical complications, but may also result in an increased rate of certain complications, including incontinence and erectile dysfunction, according to a study in the October 14 issue of JAMA

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